St Augustin

The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.
Who lives sees much, who travels sees more.



Friday, April 22, 2011

A - Z Challenge - S is for Santiago de Cuba. Happy Easter everyone!

Well, it's Good Friday here in Oz and I shouldn't be blogging, so this is on scheduled post. I won't be able to get around and comment back until Saturday, but I'll return your visit.

I see a couple of visitors chose Santiago in Chile, but no, today it's Cuba, that renegade state south of the US of A.

I'd love to travel to Cuba one day and I was reading a great book The Island that dared - Derula Murphy - on travel in Cuba recently, which contained the following story. I thought I would share it with you. A bit different to my usual posts.


Map of Cuba showing Santiago de Cuba Province

The Story of 'The Trio'

It happened one night in 1957. Soon after their father had joined Fidel Castro's guerrillas in the nearby mountains, three little girls were lifted from their beds by Batista's soldiers. Still wearing pyjamas, they were carried off to a military barracks to be held as hostages.


Graham Green, in Cuba at the time, reported this:

Next morning, I saw the revolution of the children. The news had reached the schools. In the secondary schools the children made their own dcision - they left their schools and went on the streets. The news spread. To the infants' schools the parents came and took away their children. The streets were full of them. The shops began to put up their shutters in expectation of the worst. The army gave way and released the three little girls. They could not turn fire hoses on the children in the streets as they had turned them on their mothers, or hang them from lamp posts as they would have hanged their fathers. What seems strange to me was that no report of the children's revolt ever appeared in Time - yet their correspondent was there in the city with me. But perhaps Henry Luce had not yet made up his mind between Castro and Batista.

A disturbing story. One I hadn't heard and will not forget. At least this time the children survived.



About Santiago de Cuba

Santiago de Cuba Province in Cuba is an area of 156.44 km 6 ² and population 1,043,202 people (2004). Administrative center of the province is the city of Santiago de Cuba. The city is the second largest city in Cuba.  The city Santiago de Cuba was established in 1515, first among the seven cities of Cuba, Santiago de Cuba is one of the most picturesque in the country. Due to its exceptional geographical conditions is the first capital of Cuba until 1556, when San Cristobal Announces De La Abano. Santiago de Cuba, capital of the province of the same name, is generally known for two features that make it unique city – its hospitable people with a lively informal temperament and rich historical and cultural achievements.


Situated around a huge bay on the Caribbean Sea and near the Sierra Maestra, Santiago de Cuba coexists with sea and mountain. This determines the climate, as warm and humid at the same time fascinates with its beautiful landscapes, rich combined with urban, marine and natural elements. In Santiago de Cuba are preserved historical values of the first house in America, the first cathedral in Cuba, the first copper mine opened across the American continent and the first museum in the country. Santiago de Cuba is the cradle of all musical genres in the country.



Magnificent carnivals are considered the most remarkable in Cuba. In Santiago de Cuba has an international airport. It is one of the most important and superb tourist hubs in the country with a magnificent hotel infrastructure on a beach, mountain and city. Santiago de Cuba is the only city – a hero in Cuba. So called because of its great contribution to the liberation population exploits. Cuba Travel is always very good, very beautifulo and will turn you back into the retro style of living.

I hope I can get me to Cuba one day just to see all those classic cars, hear the street music, look at all those beautifulo colours and meet those beautifulo people.

Meanwhile, where am I taking you for T? Oh, I can't wait!

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12 comments:

Duncan D. Horne said...

That was a disturbing story about the children!


Duncan In Kuantan

Sailor said...

Beautiful Blog and nice pictures. Story is sad!

Madeleine said...

Never been to Cuba, my younger brother has and was grateful to his Spanish speaking friend who went with him :O)

Clarissa Draper said...

Wow, what a story! It shows the power of children.

N. R. Williams said...

I was moved by that story as well. I fear it wouldn't have turned out so well today with all the atrocities in Africa and the Middle East.
Nancy
N. R. Williams, The Treasures of Carmelidrium.

Lenny Lee* said...

hi miss denise! i like these posts cause i love geography. i could like to go at cuba some day. one of my brothers went and he said its just real old and beautiful and full up of culture.
...hugs from lenny

notesfromnadir said...

It is a sad story & it just goes to show you that people don't want to be ruled like this. People keep escaping from Cuba & I wonder how much longer the Castro clan will keep subjugating the remaining Cubans.

Dawn Embers said...

Wow. I didn't know about most of this either. Thanks for sharing and glad you chose this post for S.

The Golden Eagle said...

That's a sad story about the children!

I recently watched a Nature documentary about Cuba--The Accidental Eden--and it looked like such an interesting place . . .

Jeanne said...

Just love reading and savoring your posts. Here I am stuck in Tamarac, Fl! Have fun and keep up the writing. And the traveling.

L'Aussie said...

Thank you for being moved by the story of the children. Cuba is fascinating.

Michael Di Gesu said...

WOW,

I've never heard of the children's uprising... Amazing!